University of Maryland

Featured Study

Paid Research Study: Health Storytelling with people who have Down Syndrome. The goal of this research study is to make health information, like charts and graphs, easier to understand and more interesting. To be in the study, you need to: be 16 years old or older, have Down Syndrome, be able to give verbal feedback, regularly use technology. What we will do together. This research study involves different kinds of activities that we will do together. Interviews. An interview is a conversation. During this conversation, we will ask you questions about: what you do to stay healthy, the technologies you use, charts and graphs. The interview will be 1 – 2 hours be long. The interview will happen either in-person or online. You will get $20 cash or gift card for every hour you do study activities. You can sign up: Online at bit.ly/DS-Tech. Call us at 850-345-1729. Email us at rewood@umd.edu

Paid Research Study: Health Storytelling with People who have Down syndrome

The goal of this research study is to make health information, like charts and graphs, easier to understand and more interesting for people with Down syndrome.

To be in the study, you must: have Down syndrome, be 16 years old or older, be able to give verbal feedback, and regularly use technology.

Participants will be paid $20 per hour (cash or gift card). Interview will be remote or in-person.

You can sign up:

·      Online at bit.ly/DS-Tech

·      Call us at 850-345-1729

·      Email us at rewood@umd.edu

Sign up for the study

Featured News

screenshot of a Zoom session with three participants and a page from the NIH website
Screenshot of an observation session on Zoom from the research study, with Dr. Emma Dixon, Ms. Diana Blackwelder, and a study participant (anonymized with an icon) viewing an NIH webpage reporting on risk factors for heart disease linked to dementia.

How People with Dementia Access Health Information: Research Identifies Barriers, Strategies, and the Potential for New Technologies

Dr. Amanda Lazar and her team presented recent research at the 2022 ACM CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems examining the barriers faced by people with dementia to accessing relevant, accurate health information, as well as the potential for AI-driven tools to support different types of memory. The inclusion of people with dementia at every stage of the research process is a key component highlighted by their work.

Even before the pandemic had us googling every possible symptom as a potential sign of a covid infection, the Internet was well established as an important source for accessing health information. Unsurprisingly, the ease of access to accurate and relevant online health information varies significantly among different populations of users. People experiencing dementia are one such user group who face particular barriers, and they are the focus of research by Dr. Emma Dixon (recent iSchool PhD graduate) and Dr. Amanda Lazar, assistant professor at the UMD iSchool and core faculty at the Trace R&D Center. According to the World Health Organization (WHO), around 55 million people worldwide are living with dementia, a number expected to double almost every 20 years, making this research even more critically important...

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Celebrating 50 Years

Trace 50th Anniversary Logo

The Trace R&D Center has been a leader in the field of Information and Communication Technology since 1971, and during the 2021-22 academic year will be celebrating its 50th anniversary.

Trace R&D Center History


About Trace

Trace PIs (left to right): Hernisa Kacorri, Gregg Vanderheiden, J. Bern Jordan, Amanda Lazar, Jonathan Lazar
Trace R & D Center Investigators (left to right): Hernisa Kacorri, Gregg Vanderheiden, J. Bern Jordan, Amanda Lazar, Jonathan Lazar

The Trace Research & Development Center has been a pioneer in the field of technology and disability, known for high-impact research and development.

About Trace R&D Center